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Posts tagged “divorce solicitors”

A living together or cohabitant agreement is a legal document that allows unmarried couples who live together to secure their finances. Not only it can clarify how you intend to maintain your everyday expenses while you live together, but can also protect you and your partner in case the relationship breaks down, avoiding the chance of future disappointments or disputes. When it comes to important matters such as housing and children's arrangements, married couples benefit from a number of rights and legal protection. This is not the case for unmarried couples, which is why a cohabitant agreement is worth discussing with your partner, should you wish to buy a property or move in together. An agreement can formalise how you share certain expenses and what will happen to your finances and assets if you and your partner separate or one of you gets ill or passes away. This has become an extremely popular option among unmarried couples living together, which are remarkably increasing every year. 
Issued by the Court, a Prohibited Steps Order (PSO) prevents a parent from carrying out certain activities relating to a child. It can be useful when parents face specific issues or are unable to agree on their children's arrangements.  
 
What can a Prohibited Steps Order do?  
 
You can apply for a PSO to stop an individual from various acts including changing a child's name, taking them out of the country or removing them from school. It doesn't apply just to parents, as it can be made against anyone regardless of their relationship to the child. 
 
A Prohibited Steps Order is made under Section 8 of the Children Act 1989. You will need to file a C100 application form and prove that you have tried mediation with the respondent. The application can be made either within existing proceedings or independently as a free-standing case. The Court will then examine the reasons behind your claim. In case of an imminent threat to your child, you can make an application for an emergency PSO, providing that you have strong evidence for the case. This means that the application is filled without notice while the respondent may not be aware of the application. 
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